Dobcross

DOBCROSS, an ecclesiastical district, in the chapelry of Saddleworth, parish of Rochdale, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 11 miles (N. E.) from Manchester. It is situated on one of the roads from Oldham to Huddersfield, and in the vicinity of several other main lines of road; and comprises by computation 1600 acres, of which between 70 and 80 are woodland, and the remainder pasture and meadow. The soil is clay and sand, with a considerable portion of black earth; the surface is hilly, with some rich vales, and the scenery varied. Several stone-quarries are wrought for local purposes. The Huddersfield and Ashton canal runs through the eastern part of the district, having a wharf about a mile and a half distant; and the Huddersfield and Manchester railway passes the village on a large and handsome viaduct. The village, which is one of the largest in the chapelry, is seated on a gentle eminence on the banks of the river Tame, whose source is about four miles from it in a north-eastern direction; the approach from the west is over a stone bridge. Between six and seven hundred persons are employed in mills for the manufacture of woollen-cloth. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Rochdale, with a net income of £150; impropriator, the Archbishop of York. The church is a neat structure in the Grecian style, erected in 1787, at an expense of £1800, raised by subscription of the inhabitants and landed proprietors: the edifice was repaired, and a tower added, in 1843.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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