Dixton (St. Peter)

DIXTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Skenfreth, union, division, and county of Monmouth, 1 mile (N. E.) from Monmouth; containing, with the hamlet of Wyesham, 751 inhabitants, of whom 239 are in the hamlet of Newton-Dixton, and 82 in that of Hadnock-Dixton. This parish, of which the greater portion is within the borough of Monmouth, comprises about 3300 acres, whereof 1400 are wood; the soil in the low lands is a loamy clay, in the high lands a light loam, and the substratum is a red sandstone, which is got in abundance. The surface is a good deal undulated, the scenery exceedingly picturesque, and the views are very extensive and beautiful, especially from the summit of the Kymin Hill, whence may be seen thirteen counties. The road from Monmouth to Ross and to Chepstow runs through the parish, which is also intersected by the Wye, that portion on the north-west side of the river being Newton-Dixton, and on the south-east side Hadnock-Dixton: a tramroad from Coleford passes on the south-east. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 1½.; net income, £223; patron, Edward Machen, Esq.; impropriators, the Duke of Beaufort, Miss Griffin, and others. There is a glebe of 12 acres, with a handsome vicarage-house in the Tudor style, erected in 1835 by the vicar, the Rev. J. L. Dighton. The church, chiefly in the early style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a low tower surmounted by a spire: in the chancel are memorials to the Griffin family. There was formerly a chapel at Wyesham, where are some slight remains called the "Friars' stump."

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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