Dinnington (St. Nicholas)

DINNINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Worksop, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 7 miles (N. W.) from Worksop; containing 279 inhabitants. A church existed here in the 12th century, founded by the Warrens, who granted it, with other churches in Yorkshire, to the distant monastery of Lewes, in Sussex, the monks of which received a small pension out of the church of Dinnington, till the Dissolution. The parish comprises by computation 1540 acres of land. Good limestone is quarried. The village is situated to the north of the road between Worksop and Sheffield, and in its vicinity is Dinnington Hall. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £103: certain tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an act of inclosure, in 1778, and there is also a commutation under the recent tithe act for a rent-charge of £142; the glebe contains 82 acres, with a glebe-house. The church was rebuilt in 1770. There is a place of worship for Methodists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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