Dilworth

DILWORTH, a township, in the chapelry of Longridge, parish of Ribchester, union of Preston, Lower division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (N. E.) from Preston; containing 845 inhabitants. In the reign of Edward I., the abbot of Cockersand included "Dylleword" among those places for which he assumed, by charter from King John, exemption from paying taxes; and a claim is preserved, but bearing no date, for the freedom of this place from fines, amercements, and tolls in all markets and fairs. According to an inquest taken on the death of the last of the Lacys, it is called "Dileworill," and the basis of the township was one carucate of land. The township is situated on the brow of Longridge Fell, and comprises 1226a. 1r. 18p. of land: on Tootle Height are valuable stone-quarries, the material from which is called Longridge stone. There is also an extensive tannery. Holly Cottage is the residence of Richard Dixon, Esq. The tithes have been commuted for £82 payable to the Bishop of Chester, and £14 to the vicar of the parish. Dilworth lies on a Roman road.—See Longridge.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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