Didsbury

DIDSBURY, a parochial chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5½ miles (S.) from Manchester; containing 5008 inhabitants, of whom 1248 are in the township of Didsbury. This chapelry, which is separated from Cheshire by the river Mersey, consists of the townships of Didsbury, Heaton-Norris, Burnage, and Withington; and comprises about 6190 acres, whereof 1560 are in Didsbury. The village lies on the road from Manchester to Congleton. A spinning, weaving, and bleaching manufactory, called Heaton-Mersey mills, employs about 1000 hands. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £188; patron, James Darwell, Esq.; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Manchester. The glebe contains 141/5 Lancashire acres, situated in the parish of Flixton. The chapel is dedicated to St. James, and is a very ancient structure, erected at different periods; it was repaired in 1620, when the tower was also rebuilt: there are several monuments to members of the families of Mosley and Bland, and a very interesting one to the family of Sir Nicolas Mosley, who was lord mayor of London about the year 1673. At Heaton-Norris is the old living of St. Thomas'. A church has lately been erected at Withington, to which the townships of Withington and Burnage have been assigned as a district; and another church has just been built at Heaton-Mersey, to which that part of the township of Heaton-Norris has been attached. The Wesleyans have a place of worship at Withington, and in the village of Didsbury a theological institution, adapted for 40 students. The building of the institution has an ornamental stone front, and retiring wings, forming three sides of a quadrangle; the centre part was the mansion of the late Col. Parker: attached are ten acres of land, beautifully laid out. Among the other places of worship is one at Heaton-Mersey for Independents, who have a college at Withington. Schools are supported by subscription, aided by a small endowment. The registers record the interment here of some officers of the royalist and parliamentary armies.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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