Deritend

DERITEND, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick. This place forms an approach to Birmingham, on the road from Coventry, by a handsome stone bridge over the river Rea, and may be regarded as an integral part of that town, partaking in every respect in its trade and manufactures. The hamlet consists principally of one spacious street, from which several others diverge; the houses are substantially built, in general of modern appearance, and are occasionally interspersed with some ancient buildings of timber and plaster, of which the Old Crown inn is a very perfect and interesting specimen. The Warwick and Birmingham canal passes through the hamlet, and on its banks are numerous works connected with the Birmingham trades, including several iron forges and foundries, in which iron-work of almost every description is manufactured; there are some extensive soap-works, a tannery, and mills for divers purposes, a large manufactory for sword-cutlery, an extensive ale-brewery, and a distillery. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, about £350; patrons, the Inhabitant Householders of Deritend and Bordesley. The chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, was erected in 1736, and repaired in 1842 at a cost of about £750; it is a neat building of brick, with a tower ornamented with stone and crowned with pinnacles, forming in almost every view of the town, from that side, a picturesque and interesting feature: the first chapel was erected here prior to 1381. Two congregations of Baptists and the Wesleyans have each a place of worship, and schools; and there are schools attached to St. John's chapel, which contain about 400 children. John Rogers, the first martyr in the reign of Queen Mary, is said to have been a native of Deritend.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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