Denver (St. Mary)

DENVER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 1 mile (S.) from Downham; containing 910 inhabitants. The parish is on the river Ouse and the road from London to Lynn, and comprises by computation 2933a. 3r. 13p., of which 1657 acres are arable, 1167 pasture, 43 woodland, and 44 common. Denver East Hall is supposed to have been erected in the reign of Henry VII. The Sluice of Denver, at the mouth of the New Bedford river, was constructed when the Bedford Level was drained: it was destroyed in 1713, by the violence of the stream, and afterwards rebuilt; it was again partly rebuilt and widened in 1834, at a cost of £30,000. Salter's Lode, in the parish, at the confluence of the Old Bedford river, has two sluices or locks, the one opening into the Well creek, and the other into the Old Bedford river, the former rebuilt in 1827, and the other in 1828. These three sluices are all navigable for small craft. The living is a rectory in medieties, viz., St. Peter's Easthall, and St. Mary's Westhall, valued in the king's books at £10. 13. 4., and in the gift of Caius College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £862, and the glebe comprises 95 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is built of rough stone, and has a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire; in the chancel is a black marble monument to the memory of Dr. Robert Brady, a native of Denver, master of Caius College, and physician in ordinary to Charles II. and James II. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. At the inclosure, 50 acres of land, let for £47, were awarded for the relief of the poor and the repair of the church.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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