Denton

DENTON, with Houghton-le-Side, a chapelry, in the parish of Gainford, union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 5½ miles (N. W.) from Darlington; containing 119 inhabitants. Denton appears to have belonged to the Balliols, and was afterwards held by the Beauchamps and Nevilles, their successors in the honour of Barnard-Castle. The township comprises by measurement 956 acres of land, which, with the exception of the glebe, is wholly the property of Matthew Culley, Esq., of Fowberry Tower, in the county of Northumberland. Limestone of excellent quality for building is found here, and there is a productive quarry in operation. The Hall, an old mansion of various age and architecture, was probably erected for the most part about the time of Charles I. The village is in a sheltered situation, and watered by a small rivulet; it was once a town of some importance, and is said to have been burnt by Malcolm, King of Scotland, on his route to Cleveland: considerable vestiges of ancient buildings may be traced in the neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Gainford, and has a net income of £50; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £136. 12. 5., and the vicarial for £63; there are 22 acres of glebe belonging to the vicar of Gainford, and 5 to the incumbent of Denton. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was rebuilt by subscription about 1810, and enlarged in 1836.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z