Denholme

DENHOLME, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2 miles (S.) from Cullingworth. It is about two miles in length and the same in breadth, and is situated on the road from Halifax to Keighley, in Craven; in its vicinity was anciently a park well stocked with deer, which has long since been thrown open. The surface is mountainous and high moorland, and what land is reduced to pasturage has been reclaimed from the moors. There are coal-mines, stone-quarries, some copperas-works, a large worsted-mill, and an extensive ale and porter brewery. The village is situated on an eminence, and is chiefly inhabited by persons employed in the mines and manufactures of the surrounding district. The parish was constituted under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37, and the church, St. Paul's, was completed in November 1846; it is in the early English style, cost upwards of £4000, and is much admired for the beauty of its architecture: the east window is of stained glass, illustrative of the life of St. Paul. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately. The Baptists, Independents, Ranters, and Wesleyans have small places of worship; and a large and handsome national and Sunday school, with a house for the master, has been built, in connexion with the church.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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