Deene (St. Peter)

DEENE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 12 miles (W. S. W.) from Wansford; containing 516 inhabitants, of whom 250 are in the hamlet of Deene-Thorpe. The parish comprises by computation 3200 acres, of which 1500 are in Deene-Thorpe; it is intersected by the road from Kettering to Stamford, and watered by a stream that falls into the river Nene. The mansion of Deene Park, the seat of the Earl of Cardigan, stands on an eminence commanding a delightful prospect; it is a low embattled structure with wings, each of them terminated by a turret, and, among other spacious apartments, has a fine hall with a timber roof reaching to the top of the building. The principal rooms exhibit many curious specimens of ancient arrangement, and are decorated with paintings of considerable interest. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 3. 6½.; net income, £350; patron, the Earl: the glebe comprises about 70 acres, with an excellent glebe-house. The church contains portions of the early and decorated English styles, and has windows exhibiting some superior tracery, and several ancient monuments to the Brudenell family. Here was a priory, a cell to the abbey of Westminster, which was suppressed soon after the Conquest, by consent of the monks, who accepted an annuity in lieu of its revenues. Henry VII. slept at Deene Hall after the battle of Bosworth-Field.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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