Davington (St. Mary Magdalene)

DAVINGTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union and hundred of Faversham, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, half a mile (N. W.) from Faversham; containing 143 inhabitants. From the numerous remains discovered, this place is supposed to have been a Roman station. A priory of Benedictine nuns was founded in 1153, probably by Fulk de Newenham, the revenue of which, in the 17th of Edward III., when the society petitioned to be exempted from the payment of taxes on account of poverty, was only £21. 13. 10.: having been entirely deserted, it escheated to the crown in the 27th of Henry VIII. The remains are considerable, and form an interesting ruin, part being the parish church, which is principally of Norman architecture, and has a beautifully arched doorway. The living is a donative, but there is now no incumbent, nor is divine service held in the church; the parochial rites are generally performed by the minister of Faversham. The parish comprises 495 acres, of which 65 are in wood. Here is a gunpowder manufactory.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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