Darwen, Lower

DARWEN, LOWER, a township, in the parish and union of Blackburn, Lower division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Blackburn; containing 3077 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry II. this place was granted to Robert Banastre, and passed by marriage with his heiress to John Langton, the first baron of Walton. The manor was held in Henry VIII.'s reign by William Bradshawe, and subsequently became a possession of Sir Thomas Walmesley, from whom it passed to the family of Lord Petre. The township is large and populous, and stretches along the east bank of the Darwen; the Blackburn, Darwen, and Bolton railway passes through the village. Coal-mines are wrought, and the population is also engaged in manufactures. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Blackburn, with a net income of £150. The chapel, now a district church, was commenced in 1827, and completed in 1829, and is a stone fabric with a hexagonal tower, dedicated to St. James; the expense of its erection, £5491, was defrayed partly by a grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners. The Wesleyan Methodists and Methodists of the New Connexion have places of worship here.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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