Darlaston

DARLASTON, a township, in the parish and union of Stone, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, N. division of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (N. W.) from Stone, on the road to Newcastle; containing 222 inhabitants. This place is of great antiquity, and according to tradition was the seat of Wulphere, King of Mercia, who put his two sons to death for embracing Christianity: on the summit of a hill at Berrybank were formerly the ruins of a large castle, fortified with a double vallum and intrenchments (still remaining) about 250 yards in diameter, said to have been his residence; and in the vicinity is a barrow, in which he is supposed to have been interred. The village of Darlaston is in Beech quarter of the parish, and is seated on the west bank of the river Trent. The common land of the township was inclosed under an act passed in 1828, with the exception of a portion of the Heath, which still forms a rugged waste.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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