Dale-Abbey

DALE-ABBEY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Derby; comprising 400 inhabitants. It has its name from an abbey of Præmonstratensian canons, founded about the year 1204, by William Fitz-Rauf, seneschal of Normandy, and his son-in-law, Jeffrey de Salicosa Mara, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary: at the Dissolution the revenue was estimated at £144. 12. The liberty comprises 1760 acres of land, the soil of which is clay, sand, and marl; and has a village situated in a vale, with a lofty range of hills on the south, commanding extensive views: the houses are mostly of brick, and thatched. Earl Stanhope is lord of the manor. Here is a chapel, an ancient and curious structure, divided into two parts by a framework screen, and having a gallery extending over three sides; it is within the jurisdiction of the manor and peculiar court of Dale-Abbey. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A fine eastern window and a solitary arch are the only remains of the abbey, with the exception of a portion of the cloisters, now part of a house.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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