Cwmyoy (St. Michael)

CWMYOY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 8 miles (N. by W.) from Abergavenny; containing, with the hamlets of Bwlch-Trewyn and Toothog, 718 inhabitants. Soon after the year 1108, a priory, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, and afterwards known by the name of Llanthony Abbey, was founded here by Hugh Lacy, for canons regular of the order of St. Augustine, many of whom, on account of the privations and hardships which they sustained in this place, removed, first to the episcopal palace at Hereford, and afterwards, in 1136, to Hyde, near Gloucester; leaving a few of their brethren at the original settlement at Llanthony, whose revenue, in the 26th of Henry VIII., was estimated at £100. The parish is about eight miles in length, and one mile in breadth, forming a rich and fertile valley, inclosed on both sides by lofty hills, which extend from one extremity of the parish to the other, and watered by a rivulet called the Honddu, along the bank of which is the road to Abergavenny. Nearly in the centre of this picturesque vale are the ruins of the abbey, consisting of the gateway, and part of the conventual building. The chapel of Llanthony, a plain edifice, is situated close to the ruins. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £68; patron, R. Powell, Esq. There are places of worship for Welsh Methodists and Baptists; and a school supported by subscription. At the extreme part of the Black mountain is a fine specimen of a Roman encampment.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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