Curry, North (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CURRY, NORTH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of Somerset, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Taunton; comprising the tythings of North Curry, Knapp, Lillesdon, and Wrantage; and containing 2028 inhabitants, of whom 950 are in the tything of North Curry. This place appears to have been known to the Romans, an urn containing a quantity of silver coins of that people having been discovered in 1748: it was subsequently held by the Saxon kings, and retained in demesne by the Conqueror. King John granted it a market, which was held on Wednesday, but has been long discontinued. The parish comprises by admeasurement 5500 acres, of which about 1600 are arable, 90 woodland, and the rest pasture; the navigable river Tone passes in the vicinity. Newport, in the parish, anciently possessed the privileges and officers of a corporate town, and is still called a borough; it had also a chapel. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of West Hatch annexed, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Wells, valued in the king's books at £21; impropriator, C. Holcombe Dare, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £650, and the vicarial for £220; the glebe consists of 2½ acres, with a glebe-house. There are places of worship for Particular Baptists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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