Cuddesden (All Saints)

CUDDESDEN (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullington, county of Oxford, 6½ miles (E. S. E.) from Oxford; containing, with the chapelries of Denton and Wheatley, and the hamlet of Chippinghurst, 1483 inhabitants, of whom 305 are in the township of Cuddesden. This place has been for many years distinguished as one of the residences of the bishops of Oxford. According to Wood's Athenæ, a palace was built in 1635, by Bishop Bancroft, at an expense of £3500, exclusively of a large grant of timber from Shotover Forest, by Charles I.; this edifice was burnt down by Colonel Legge, in 1644, from an apprehension that it might be converted into a garrison by the parliamentarians, and was rebuilt in 1679, by Bishop Fell. Extensive repairs and improvements were made in 1846-7, a neat chapel added, and the gardens enlarged. The living consists of a vicarage and rectory, annexed to the bishopric, and valued in the king's books at £17. 0. 5.; the tithes have been commuted for £315, and the glebe contains nearly 30 acres. The church is a spacious and handsome cruciform structure, chiefly Norman, with some later portions; the west entrance is a fine specimen of the Norman style, and the arch under the tower is highly enriched with zigzag mouldings and other details: there are some interesting monuments to Bishop Bancroft (who was interred near the south wall of the chancel) and Bishops Moss and Jackson. At Wheatley is a separate incumbency, in the gift of the Bishop.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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