Cubberley (St. Giles)

CUBBERLEY (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Cheltenham, partly in the hundred of Bradley, but chiefly in that of Rapsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4½ miles (S. by E.) from Cheltenham; containing 231 inhabitants. This place during the parliamentary war afforded an asylum for one night to Charles II., who, travelling in disguise after the battle of Worcester, slept at the parsonage-house the evening before he effected his escape. The parish is situated within a quarter of a mile of the new road from Cheltenham to Cirencester, and comprises by measurement 3421 acres: stone of inferior quality is quarried. The principal source of the river Thames, called the Seven Springs, is in the parish: the stream turns a mill within half a mile from the spot whence it issues. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of Henry Elwes, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £470, and the glebe comprises 17½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church, said to have been rebuilt in 1330, by Sir Thomas de Berkeley, is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, and contains several ancient and interesting monuments: the statue of Sir Thomas is still remaining in a niche in the south aisle; against the north wall, under a recess, is the figure of a knight in bold relief; and there are also the effigies of a crusader, and of a lady in the dress of the fourteenth century. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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