Crumpsall

CRUMPSALL, a township, in the parish and union of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Manchester, on the road to Bury; containing 2745 inhabitants. It comprises 826 acres, nearly the whole of which is pasture land, occupied chiefly by farmers who supply the town of Manchester with milk and other dairy produce. The surface is undulated; and being highly favourable for the erection of villas, cottages ornées, &c., many have been built by the merchants and shop-keepers of Manchester, in pleasant situations. The river Irk, a tributary to the Irwell, bounds the township; and several considerable works have been established on its banks. There are, a spinning and weaving mill, built in 1832, and enlarged in 1845, the property of John Brooks, Esq., and occupied by Messrs. Simpson, Thompson, and Company, having 170-horse steam-power, and employing 900 hands; a calico-printing establishment, carried on by Thomas Fielden, Esq.; and some Turkey-red dye-works, the property of, and conducted by, Messrs. Louis and Michael Delaunay, whose father, a native of France, commenced the first dye-works for that colour in the neighbourhood. Crumpsall Hall was the residence of the ancestors of the ducal family of Howard.

The "village" comprehends portions of the townships of Crumpsall, Cheetham, and Broughton, and is commonly known by the name of Cheetham-Hill; it contains two inns, and as many as twelve beer-houses. The tithes of the township belong to the Dean and Canons of Manchester, and amount to £90 per annum. The Wesleyans have a large and handsome meetinghouse, with a commodious day and Sunday school; and the Methodists two places of worship. In 1785 three cottages were built, out of the rent of which the sum of £13 is paid in support of St. Mark's school, in Cheetham. Humphrey Cheetham or Chetham, the founder of the Blue-coat hospital in Manchester, was born here in 1580: five of the boys are eligible from this place. The township can boast of another benefactor in George Clarke, who bequeathed to the poor the rents of three farms within it, to be distributed yearly in clothing, bedding, &c. The trustees of this charity some years ago obtained an act to enable them to sell the land for building on, which greatly increased the income of the estate, now about £2000 per annum; the cost of the farms having been £300 only, at the time of Mr. Clarke's purchase of them. The distribution of the proceeds is made every winter by the boroughreeve of Manchester, under the title of the Boroughreeve's Charity.—See Cheetham.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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