Crosby, Great

CROSBY, GREAT, a chapelry, in the parish of Sefton, union and hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Liverpool; containing, in the year 1846, 2194 inhabitants. Among the families early connected with Great Crosby, were those of De Aynosdale, Molyneux, Ferrers, and De Walton, of whom Robert De Walton took the name of Blundell, and was ancestor of the Blundells of Little Crosby, and the Blundells of Ince-Blundell. William Blundell, Esq., is now lord of the manor and principal proprietor. The chapelry comprises 2066 acres, whereof 561 are common land or waste. The population has very considerably increased within the last thirty years. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector of Sefton; income, £200. The chapel, dedicated to St. Luke, is a brick building with a tower, re-erected in 1774, and enlarged in 1847, at a cost of £250. The tithes have been commuted for £280. A Roman Catholic chapel dedicated to St. Peter was built in 1826: the Rev. William Brown was the first appointed priest, and still officiates. The grammar school here was founded in 1620, by John Harrison, merchant of London, a native of the township, and has an endowment of £50 a year, and a house and garden; the mastership is in the gift of the Merchant Taylors' Company, London, and the present head master is the Rev. Joseph Clark, appointed in 1829: the school is a good building of freestone. A school for girls, founded under the will of Catherine Halsall, is endowed with lands of the value annually of £40. Here is a spring, called St. Michael's.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z