Crondall (All Saints)

CRONDALL (All Saints), anciently Crunde-Halle, a parish, in the union of Hartley-Wintney, hundred of Crondall, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Farnham; containing, with the tythings of Crookham, Dippenhall, Ewshott, and Swanthorpe, 2199 inhabitants, of whom 423 are in the township of Crondall. The parish comprises by computation nearly 10,000 acres, of which 4612 are arable, 740 pasture and meadow, 904 woodland, and 3650 common. Almost every variety of soil is to be found, from barren shingly gravel and sand, to rich alluvial mould, productive marls, and dry clays on a chalk substratum, yielding abundant crops of corn, clover, turnips, &c., and hops almost rivalling the produce of the celebrated "Hart-ground" at Farnham. In some spots chalk or marl stones are dug, adapted for rough buildings; and a stratum of fine chalk runs diagonally through the southern end of the parish. A rivulet has its source in the village, and flowing through the parish, forms a tributary to the river Loddon; the London and South-Western railway and the Basingstoke canal cross the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £22. 5. 7½.; net income, £441; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Cross, Winchester, who have leased the great tithes to the Marquess of Winchester. The church is of great antiquity, the nave being of early and the chancel of later Norman, with zig-zag mouldings; it contains several monuments, some with Saxon inscriptions, and others with figures in brass, and is said to have suffered much during the wars of the Commonwealth. A district church in the early English style, built by subscription, has been consecrated; and there are places of worship for Independents, Ranters, and Bryanites. The late Henry Maxwell, Esq., of Ewshott House (the principal residence in the parish), presented a building for a school in connexion with the Establishment, and bequeathed £1250 for the maintenance of a master. At the north-eastern extremity of the parish is Cæsar's camp, a spot of singular and commanding position; the earthworks are of considerable extent, with deep ditches, and in the centre is a spring.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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