Crathorne (All Saints)

CRATHORNE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of the county of York, 4 miles (S. S. E.) from Yarm; containing 304 inhabitants. This place, which is in the district called Cleveland, and situated on the western side of the vale of the river Leven, anciently belonged to the Crathorne family, who were settled here for many generations, and of whom Sir William Crathorne, Knt., died in the early part of the 14th century. The parish comprises about 2450 acres, of which 1722 are arable and in good cultivation, 500 meadow and pasture, and 200 woodland and plantations. The surface is generally level, the scenery enriched with wood, and in many situations very pleasing; the soil near the village, and on the banks of the Leven, which here abounds in trout, is a gravelly loam, but in most other parts a poor clay. Good white freestone, used for building purposes, is obtained from the bed of the river. The village is situated on the road to Thirsk: many of the inhabitants were formerly employed in the linen manufacture, which was carried on to a considerable extent, and there was also a spacious bleach-ground in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 10½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Tasburgh, with a net income of £205. The church is a small ancient structure, in the chancel of which is the recumbent effigy of a knight, supposed to be Sir William Crathorne. There is a Roman Catholic chapel, originally founded by the Crathorne family, and rebuilt about 1825. Near the village is a chalybeate spring.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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