Cowpen, or Coopen

COWPEN, or Coopen, a township, in the chapelry of Horton, union of Tynemouth, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 8 miles (E. S. E.) from Morpeth; containing 2464 inhabitants. This township, which is called in old records Cupum, Cupin, Copun, or Couperum, comprises about 1553 acres, and extends nearly two miles along the southern bank of the Blyth, which is navigable. The canons of Brinkburn and the monks of Tynemouth had salt-mines here, the latter being also owners of much of the land, and there were formerly several other salt-works near the river; but they have all long since disappeared. That portion of the Bedlington iron-works in which engines are constructed, is in this township, adjoining the river, and employs numerous hands: there are also four cornmills, two of which are worked by steam; a large colliery; and at Cowpen quay a ship-building yard. The village lies about a mile west of the port of Blyth, on the highway between that place and Newcastle, and about a quarter of a mile from the Blyth river; it contains several good houses, all of modern date except the Hall, at present in the occupation of a farmer. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £295, payable in moieties to the Duke of Northumberland and M. J. F. Sidney, Esq., and the vicarial for £36, payable to the vicar of Woodhorn. There are places of worship in the township for congregations of Burghers, Methodists of the New Connexion, Primitive Methodists, and Roman Catholics.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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