Coppenhall (St. Michael)

COPPENHALL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester; comprising 2629 acres, and containing, in 1841, 747 inhabitants, of whom 544 were in the township of Church-Coppenhall, 5 miles (N. E.) from Nantwich, and 203 in that of Monks-Coppenhall. The manor of Church-Coppenhall belonged soon after the Conquest to the family of Waschett; about the end of the thirteenth century it is supposed to have passed to the De Orrebys, and among subsequent owners have been the families of Corbet, Hulse, Shaw, and Broughton. Monks-Coppenhall appears to derive its prefix from having belonged at an early period to the monks of Combermere: of the families that have held the property since, may be named those of Crue, Burnell, Vernon, and Cholmondeley. The Liverpool and Birmingham railway extends for nearly 2½ miles in the parish, the Chester and Crewe railway for a mile and a half, and the Crewe and Manchester for nearly two miles. (See Crewe.) The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 10., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield: the tithes have been commuted for £275, and the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church, built of wood and plaster, in the style which prevailed in the reign of Elizabeth, was taken down, and rebuilt of brick, in 1821. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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