Combe-Fields, or Combe-Abbey

COMBE-FIELDS, or Combe-Abbey, an extraparochial liberty, in the union of Rugby, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 5¼ miles (E.) from Coventry; containing 195 inhabitants, and comprising 3656 acres. It is well watered by two branches of the river Sow, which partly bound it on the east and west; the Oxford canal winds through the district, and it is also intersected by the road from Coventry to Lutterworth. Richard de Camvilla, in 1150, founded here a Cistercian abbey, which was dedicated to St. Mary, and richly endowed; at the Dissolution it contained about fourteen monks, and was valued at £343. 0. 5. per annum. The site, which was granted by Edward VI. to the Earl of Warwick, is occupied by the manor-house: there are still some vestiges of the cloisters. The present noble mansion, the seat of the Earl of Craven, was chiefly erected by Lord Harrington in the reign of James I., but has since received many additions, rendering it one of the finest seats in the country; the apartments are sumptuously furnished, and are adorned with paintings by the best masters. The park is beautifully diversified, enriched with wood and water, and embracing wide prospects.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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