Collingham, South (St. John the Baptist)

COLLINGHAM, SOUTH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Newark, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (N. N. E.) from Newark; containing 721 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Newark to Gainsborough, and bounded on the west by the river Trent, consists of 2862a. 2r. 25p.; the surface, though generally flat, acquires a degree of elevation towards the east. The soil is extremely various, comprising almost every variety, from the richest loam to the most sterile heath; near the village it is sandy, but well adapted to the growth of early vegetables, of which large quantities are raised. In the centre of the village is a magnificent elm, planted in 1745 to commemorate the retreat of the Pretender from Derby. The Collingham station of the Nottingham and Lincoln railway is 10½ miles from the Lincoln station, and 5¼ from that of Newark. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 1. 10½.; gross income, £426; patron, the Bishop of Peterborough. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1790. The church was built at various periods, the most ancient part being the piers and arches on the north side, which are of the 12th century, very massive and richly ornamented with zigzag and other mouldings; the piers of the south side are of the early English style, with plain pointed arches. The chancel is of the 14th century, with square-headed windows; the east window, which is large and of five lights, was added late in the 15th century: the tower, aisles, porch, and clerestory are of the same period. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans; and a national school supported by subscription. Here is a place called Potter's Hill, where many Roman relics have been found; and south of this, on the Fosse-road, on the Lincolnshire boundary, is the site of the Crocolana of Antoninus, now occupied by the village of Brough, where coins, termed Brugh pennies, have been ploughed up, and ancient foundations often discovered. Human bones, with remains of coffins, have also been turned up in a place called the Chapel Close, in the scattered hamlet of Danethorpe; where was formerly a chapel connected with the priory of Thurgarton.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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