Coldhurst

COLDHURST, an ecclesiastical parish or district, in the parish of Prestwich-cum-Oldham, union of Oldham, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (N. E. by N.) from Manchester. It is nearly three miles in circumference, and is principally pasture and meadow land, of hilly surface. The turnpike-road from Oldham to Rochdale passes through it. Coal-mines are wrought, and cotton and hat manufactories carried on. An old Hall here, belonging to Abram Crompton, Esq., is now converted into cottages. The district was constituted in October, 1844, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37, and the erection of a church was commenced in the summer of 1847; it is in the early English style, and built on a site presented by Mr. Crompton. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. Within the district are some fine springs. Coldhurst is said to have been the scene of an action in the rebellion, in which the parliamentarians were defeated.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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