Cogges (St. Mary)

COGGES (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 1¼ mile (S. E. by E.) from Witney; containing 757 inhabitants. Some of the family of Arsic, who were lords of the barony, founded here an alien priory of Black monks, subordinate to the abbey of Fescamp, in Normandy: after the dissolution of foreign cells, its possessions were granted by Henry VI. to Eton College. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £64; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of the College. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1787. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower having a pyramidal roof: the north aisle is ornamented with rich mouldings, and grotesque figures playing on musical instruments; and between it and the chancel is a handsome altar-tomb. In 1695, William Blake bequeathed land producing about £50 per annum, chiefly for instruction. To the south of the church, on a spot called Castle Yard, foundations, supposed to be those of a castle, are frequently dug up; and at Wilcot, in the parish, is an old chapel, in which are the arms of the family of Pope, and a mural tablet to the memory of John Price, keeper of the Bodleian library at Oxford.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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