Codnor, with Loscoe

CODNOR, with Loscoe, an ecclesiastical parish or district, partly in the parishes of Denby and Pentrich, union of Belper, but chiefly in the parish of Heanor, union of Basford, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of Derbyshire, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Heanor. This district comprises the township of Codnor and Loscoe, in Heanor parish, containing 1738 inhabitants, of whom 1314 are in Codnor; the extraparochial liberty of Codnor-Park, with 815 inhabitants; and portions of Denby and Pentrich. The township comprises 1894 acres, and the liberty 1320. The manor of Codnor was held at the Domesday survey, under William Peverel; and belonged to the family of Grey as early as 1211, when Codnor Castle became the seat of the elder branch of that noble house. Richard de Grey was one of the loyal barons in the reign of Henry III.; and John, Lord Grey, distinguished himself in the Scottish wars, in that of Edward III. The last lord Grey, of Codnor, died about 1526; he was a philosopher and alchymist, and had a licence to practise the transmutation of metals. The estate eventually devolved to Sir John Zouch, who sold it in 1634 to Archbishop Neile and his son Sir Paul; and their descendant disposed of the manor and castle, with the members, to Sir Streynsham Master, high sheriff in 1712, who occupied the castle. The park contained about 3200 acres; and it is said that six farmhouses, with their out-buildings, were raised with the materials taken from the ruins of Codnor Castle.

The district lies on the eastern confines of the county, and the land is nearly equally divided between arable and pasture; the higher parts command extensive views. Coal and ironstone are wrought, employing many of the population, and the Butterley Iron Company have three blast-furnaces here; there is also a manufactory of stone-ware bottles, and frame-work knitting is carried on. Facility of conveyance is afforded both by canal and railway. The parish was formed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37; the living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £150 per annum, and in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Lichfield, alternately. The church, dedicated to St. James, was consecrated in 1844, and is a neat building with a tower. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; and good schools on the national system. The sum of £11 per annum was left in 1731 by Jonathan Tantum, twothirds to the poor, and one-third to the Society of Friends. Loscoe Park has been long disparked, and the house, for several generations the seat of the Draycotts, pulled down.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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