Cobridge

COBRIDGE, a village, partly in the parish of Burslem, and partly in that of Stoke-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Newcastle; the Burslem portion containing 1584 inhabitants. The ville of Rushton, which has been superseded by Cobridge, is described in Domesday book under the name of Risetone; it was given by Henry de Audley to Hulton Abbey, to which it became the grange, and since the Dissolution has been in the possession of the ancient family of Biddulph. Cobridge is in the Staffordshire Potteries, situated on an eminence, midway between Burslem and Hanley, and contains several manufactories and collieries. A neat district church, dedicated to Christ, has been erected by the rector of Burslem, aided by the Church Commissioners and the Diocesan Society; it is in the English style, with a tower, and affords accommodation to about 560 persons. The living is in the gift of the Rector. There are a chapel belonging to Roman Catholics, and a meeting-house for the New Connexion of Methodists. Schoolrooms were erected by subscription in 1766.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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