Clytha

CLYTHA, a hamlet, in the parish of Llanarth, union of Abergavenny, division and hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Raglan; containing 335 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on the left bank of the river Usk, and intersected by the high roads leading from Abergavenny to Monmouth and Usk, contains by estimation 1503a. 2r. 17p., of which 683 acres are arable, 776 pasture and meadow, and 44 woodland. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £115, and there is a glebe of about 2 acres. Clytha House is a handsome mansion in the Grecian style, with a noble portico, standing in tastefully laid-out grounds; near it are the remains of an ancient chapel, and on the brow of a lofty eminence contiguous stands a castellated building, erected in 1790, by the late William Jones, Esq., to the memory of his lady, and whence is a beautiful and extensive view of the vale of the Usk, with the Blorange, Sugar Loaf, and Skirrid mountains in the distance. Upon the summit of another eminence, at the extremity of the Clytha hills, is a small encampment called Coed-y-Bunnedd, which retains marks of having been strongly fortified.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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