Cliffe, King's (All Saints)

CLIFFE, KING'S (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Willybrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (W. S. W.) from Wansford; containing 1278 inhabitants. This was anciently the head of a bailiwick in the forest of Rockingham, called the Clive, and had a royal mansion, in which the kings of England passed some days in their progresses or hunting excursions, prior to the year 1400. The parish is situated on a slope, and surrounded by woods; it comprises by measurement 2200 acres. A small number of the population is employed in the manufacture of wooden-ware; and there are quarries of freestone and limestone, for building and manure. A market, not much frequented, is held weekly, on Tuesday; and a fair for cattle, horses, and cheese, on the 29th of October: the market cross was demolished in 1834. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 16. 3.; net income, £525; patron, the Earl of Westmoreland: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809; the glebe contains 477 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a spacious cruciform structure, in the early and later English styles, with a tower rising from the centre, and contains some beautiful details; the pulpit, reading-desk, and open sittings, were formed out of carved oak originally in the collegiate church at Fotheringay, and placed here in 1818. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. Schools, and almshouses for six aged women, were respectively endowed by Mrs. Elizabeth Hutcheson and the Rev. William Law, with land comprising together 409 acres, producing an income of £407; in addition to which, an accumulation of £517 reduced annuities yields £15 per annum. There are other almshouses, founded by John Thorpe, in 1688, for three aged women. Dr. Michael Hudson, chaplain to Charles I., was rector for a short time; and the Rev. William Law, author of the Serious Call, was born in 1686, at this place, where he resided during the last twenty years of his life, and was buried. A Roman cemetery has been discovered, on an ancient road called "John's Wood Riding," which runs through the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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