Cleobury, North (St. Peter)

CLEOBURY, NORTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 1 mile (N. by E.) from Burwarton; containing 176 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1145 acres, exclusive of about 430 of uninclosed land forming part of the Brown Clee hill, once a forest, and which is the highest hill in the county, rising to an elevation of 1805 feet. Coal-mines are worked, but they are supposed to be nearly exhausted; and good stone is quarried for buildings. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 12. 3½., and in the gift of Henry George Mytton, Esq.: the glebe comprises 75 acres, with a glebe-house. The church was enlarged and thoroughly repaired in 1834. Upon the summit of the Brown Clee hill are the remains of an encampment, partly in the parish of North Cleobury, supposed to be a work of the Britons when besieged by the Roman army; and on the Burfs, which is the highest peak of the hill, and between a mile and a mile and a half distant from the village, is a poetical inscription, celebrating the independence, valour, and love of liberty of the ancient Britons, written by the Rev. Thomas Warter, a man of great literary attainments, and many years rector of the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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