Clement's (St.

CLEMENT'S (ST.), a parish, in the union of Truro, W. division of the hundred of Powder and of the county of Cornwall; containing 3436 inhabitants. This parish, of which a very considerable, and by far the most populous, portion adjoins the town of Truro, comprises by computation 3200 acres. The surface is hilly, but of moderate elevation, and the soil is generally fertile, more especially in those parts bordering on the town, where some of the meadow land is let at £12 per acre. The grounds are watered by two small rivulets; the one, the Tresilian river, which falls into an arm of the sea at the north-east extremity of the parish; and the other the Alleyn, which flows by Truro, and bounds the parish on the south-west. Polwhele, anciently a castle of some strength, and subsequently the family seat of the ancestors of the historian of the county of Cornwall, was the temporary residence of Charles I., who, for a short time, took refuge here after his defeat in 1646; it has been much improved, and is now occupied by Major Polwhele. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Cornwall; net income, £243: impropriators, H. P. Andrew, Esq., and the heirs of Mr. Vivian. The church, a plain neat structure with a tower, contains a handsome monument to Samuel Thomas, Esq., one of the last and best works of the artist Bacon, and a monument of white marble, executed in Italy, and inscribed by Admiral Lord Exmouth to the memory of Rear-Admiral Reynolds, who was shipwrecked on board the St. George of 98 guns, off the coast of Jutland, on the 24th of December, 1811. There are some mineral springs in the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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