Claydon

CLAYDON, a chapelry, in the parish of Cropredy, union and hundred of Banbury, county of Oxford, 6½ miles (N.) from Banbury; containing 337 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. James, and is a small edifice, with a north aisle divided from the nave by four arches of Norman character; the tower is of the 15th century. The village is situated in the northern extremity of the county: a small spring which rises in it has the peculiarity of emitting the largest quantity of water in the driest weather. Here is found the pyrites aureus, or golden firestone; also the asteria, or star-stone, called by Gesner sigillum stellœ, from its use in sealing: in splitting some of these, the figure of a rose is plainly discernible.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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