Claybrooke (St. Peter)

CLAYBROOKE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth; comprising the townships of Great and Little Claybrooke, the chapelry of Wigston Parva, the hamlet of Ullesthorpe, and the liberty of Bittesby, in the hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester; and the chapelry of Wibtoft, in the Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick; the whole containing 1417 inhabitants, of whom 519 are in Great Claybrooke, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Lutterworth, and 104 in Little Claybrooke. The parish is situated on the road from London to Hinckley and Atherstone; the surface is pleasingly undulated, and the soil in some few places sandy, but in general a rich loam. A part of the population is employed in the stocking manufacture, which is carried on to a considerable extent. The Midland railway passes through the parish, and the Ullesthorpe station is within its limits. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £30. 10. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators, the Earl of Denbigh, Trinity College, Cambridge, and others; net income, £451, with a glebe-house. The church is at Little Claybrooke, and is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style. There are chapels of ease at Wibtoft and Little Wigston; and the Independents have a place of worship. A school was endowed by Mark Smith with £26 per annum, and is aided by an annual sum of £26 from Alderman Newton's charity: J. E. Dicey, Esq., of Claybrooke Hall, has erected a school for females, which he supports. This was the Roman station Benonœ, or Vennones; and at a place termed High Cross, two miles westward, two great Roman roads intersect, which traversed the kingdom obliquely.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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