Claughton

CLAUGHTON, a township, in the parish and union of Garstang, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Garstang; containing 772 inhabitants. This place gave name to a local family, of whom Richard de Clacton appears in a deed without date as a benefactor of Cockersand Abbey. The Banastre family held a moiety of the manor in Edward II.'s reign; and Claughton is afterwards found in possession of the Brockholes, whose descendant, in the last century, devised his estates to William Fitzherbert, Esq., of Swynnerton Hall, Staffordshire, with injunction to take the name and arms of Brockholes. The township lies on the road from Lancaster to Preston, and comprises 3785a. 2r. 4p. of land: the Lancaster and Preston railway and canal also pass through it. Claughton Hall, the seat of the family of Fitzherbert Brockholes, is a noble stone mansion, surrounded by a well-wooded park of 500 acres, abounding with game, and commanding beautiful views. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £350. At a short distance from the Hall is a Roman Catholic chapel, a neat building in the Grecian style; the interior is very handsome, especially the altar: adjoining is the house of the priest, the Rev. Henry Gradwell. There is a small cotton-mill.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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