Christ-Church

CHRIST-CHURCH, a parish, in the union of St. Saviour's, partly in the E. division of the hundred of Brixton, but chiefly within the borough of Southwark, E. division of Surrey; containing 14,606 inhabitants. This parish was anciently termed the liberty of Paris Garden, and formed a part of the parish of St. Saviour until 1706, when it was made distinct by act of parliament. It is situated on the south side of Blackfriars bridge, and has several ranges of good houses on both sides of Great Surrey-street, including Nelsonsquare on the east, and a portion of Stamford-street on the west. There are manufactories for hats, for glass, and for various articles of statuary in Roman cement; extensive saw-mills; a large cooperage; and works for refining antimony, and making albata. At the end of the bridge is a building originally called the Leverian Museum, and subsequently the Rotunda, which has been used for various purposes. Christ-Church constituted a portion of the borough of Southwark, under a charter of Edward VI., though the inhabitants did not for many years vote for its parliamentary members, having allowed the privilege to fall into disuse; they have, however, been re-invested with the franchise, by the act of the 2nd of William IV., cap. 45.

The living is a rectory not in charge, in the patronage of the Trustees of Marshall's charity: the church is a neat edifice of brick, with a tower surmounted by a cupola. Surrey chapel, built by the late Rev. Rowland Hill, is within the parish; and there are also places of worship for Baptists and Unitarians, the latter of which, in Stamford-street, has a fine portico of six fluted Doric columns supporting a triangular pediment. The parochial schools, on the national system, in Green Walk, were rebuilt in 1836, at an expense of nearly £2000. The British and Foreign school, situated in an alley opposite the workhouse, contains a spacious schoolroom for boys, and one of smaller dimensions for girls. The workhouse, since the incorporation of the parish with the union of St. Saviour's, has been enlarged at an expense of nearly £8000. Almshouses in Green Walk were founded and endowed by Mr. Charles Hopton, for 28 poor men, each of whom has a separate house of two rooms; and in Church-street are almshouses for 45 women, endowed by Mr. Edward Edwards in 1753, the buildings consisting of four separate ranges of neat houses, erected successively in 1753, 1777, 1786, and 1791. There are various charities for general purposes, all of minor account except Marshall's charity, founded by John Marshall in 1627, and producing nearly £900 per annum; Hammerton's, producing £230 per annum; and Boyse's, producing £160 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z