Christchurch (Holy Trinity)

CHRISTCHURCH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 2¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Newport; containing, with the hamlet of Caerton ultra Pontem, 1310 inhabitants. This parish, in the year 1291, belonged to the neighbouring priory of Goldclift, which was annexed to the abbey of Tewkesbury in 1442, and in 1451, with its possessions, granted to Eton College. The parish is partly bounded by the river Usk, which separates it from Caerleon, the Isca Silurum of the Romans; and comprises 4941 acres, whereof 150 are common or waste. The surface is marked throughout by hills and undulations beautifully wooded, and the soil consists of several varieties of sand and clay; limestone is extensively quarried for manure and other purposes. The petty-sessions for the division are held here. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 4. 2., and in the patronage of Eton College: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £150, and the vicarial for £265; the glebe contains 90 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a large and elegant edifice, occupying an elevated situation. At a farm called Bullmore, was a Roman burial-ground.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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