Chetton (St. Giles)

CHETTON (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Bridgnorth; containing, with the chapelry of Loughton, 693 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Bridgnorth to Ludlow, and intersected in the southern part by the road to Cleobury-Mortimer; it comprises by measurement 4945 acres, the surface of which is undulated, and the soil a strong clay, resting upon marl and coarse limestone, with some sandstone. Coal of moderate quality and of sulphureous smell is procured in tolerable quantity. Clay for brick-making, which is carried on to some extent, is obtained near the collieries; and in the parish generally is found a brecciated limestone, which, when burnt, is of a reddish colour, and is used for manure, but considered to have only half the strength of white lime. There is likewise abundance of red sandstone alternated with the limestone, which is used for rubble-masonry and for building cottages: in the southeast portion of the parish, white freestone of good quality is quarried; and there is also some good flagstone. A few inconsiderable streams intersect the surface and run into the Severn. The living is a rectory, with the livings of Deuxhill and Glazeley consolidated in 1760, valued in the king's books at £11; patron, T. W. W. Browne, Esq. The tithes, including those of Loughton, have been commuted for £654. 14. 9., and the glebe comprises 11 acres. The nave of the church was rebuilt about the year 1770; the tower was rebuilt in 1830, and, like the chancel, which is ancient, is in the early English style. There is a bequest of about £8 per annum for teaching children; a national school was erected in 1821. The produce of bequests amounting to £260, is distributed among the poor in bread and clothing.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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