Chesterton (St. Andrew)

CHESTERTON (St. Andrew), a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Chesterton, county of Cambridge, 1¼ mile (N. E.) from Cambridge; containing 1617 inhabitants. The name of this place is derived from a castrum, or fortification, called Arbury Camp, at a small distance from the village, three parts of the vallum of which are still remaining, inclosing a square area of nearly six acres, where many Roman coins have been found. It appears that every one who kept a fire here, in 1154, was bound to pay an Ely farthing, as it was called, to St. Peter's altar, in the cathedral of Ely; and the fourth farthing arising from this town and that of Grantchester used to be paid to the castle of Norwich, by the name of Ely ward penny, because that place received it before. The parish is watered by the river Cam, and comprises 2729 acres, of which 169 are common or waste; the soil is in general a gravelly earth, with a subsoil of clay. In 1837, an act was passed for inclosing waste lands. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 3½.; net income, £206; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £500, and the vicarial for £180; the impropriate glebe consists of 90½ acres, and the vicarial contains 27½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church is principally in the decorated and later English styles. The poor law union of Chesterton comprises 38 parishes or places, and contains a population of 21,608. The remains of Cambridge Castle are in the parish.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z