Cheddleton (St. Edward)

CHEDDLETON (St. Edward), a parish, in the union of Cheadle, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Leek; comprising the townships of Basford, Cheddleton, and Consall or Cunsall; and containing 1824 inhabitants, of whom 1285 are in the township of Cheddleton. The parish consists of 8850 acres, whereof 1000, probably, are woodland, and the remainder chiefly pasture; in some parts sand prevails, in others clay, with peat or a dark soil on the surface, and the scenery is very beautiful. Coal is wrought, and gritstone and burr-stone quarried; there are also a silkthrowing-mill, a paper-mill established a few years since, a dye-house, a brewery, and some coal and lime wharfs. The river Churnet intersects the parish; and the Churnet Valley railway, and Caldon and Uttoxeter branches of the Trent and Mersey canal, also pass through. Among the residences here, are, Ashcombe, the seat of William Sneyd, Esq., a very substantial mansion in the Grecian style; Rownall Hall, of Smith Child, Esq.; and Basford Hall, of the Rev. John Sneyd. This last has been rebuilt on an ancient site by the present owner, in the Elizabethan style, and is beautifully situated on the brow of a hill, commanding a splendid panoramic view of the country around, including an ornamental castle lately erected, a spacious plain, the vale of the Churnet, and some fine woodland and mountain scenery. Here is also a good old mansion called Mosslee, originally the property of the Hollins family, from whom it descended by marriage to the Boothbys; it now belongs to Mr. Sneyd of Ashcombe. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £160; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Edward Powys. The land is almost wholly tithefree. The church, situated on an eminence, is in the pointed style, and embellished with a tower. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and a church has been built at Wetley Rocks, which see. In 1724, James Whitehall bequeathed £200 for teaching children, and £30 to build a schoolroom; John Bagnall added a rentcharge of £5. At a field near Ferny hill is the shaft of a very ancient cross, eleven feet high, standing on three circular stone steps.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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