Chartham (St. Mary)

CHARTHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Felborough, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Canterbury; containing, with the chapelry of Horton, 974 inhabitants. It comprises 4530 acres; and is situated on the river Stour, over which, near the village, is an ancient structure of five arches, called Shalmsford Bridge. About 700 acres are covered with wood. The manufacture of paper is carried on to a moderate extent, and there are also some seed-mills. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £41. 5. 10., and in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury: the tithes have been commuted for £800, and there is a glebe of 34¾ acres. The church is of early decorated architecture, with very fine windows, and some remains of richlystained glass; the roof is of wood and the tower of flint, both being of later date than the stone-work. It contains a monumental arch and some old brasses, one in particular of Sir Robert Septvan, having the alæ of the knight's armour, and in other respects peculiar; in the chancel lie the remains of Dr. John Reading, chaplain to Charles I., and author of some religious tracts. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Numerous tumuli, raised over the slain in the decisive conflict between Cæsar and Cassivelaunus, lie scattered at the distance of about three-quarters of a mile from the church, on the road to Canterbury.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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