Charlton, Kings (St. Mary)

CHARLTON, KINGS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cheltenham, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Cheltenham; containing 3232 inhabitants. This place participated in the hostilities of the parliamentary war during the reign of Charles I.; and a hill since called Battledowns, was the scene of a sanguinary conflict in which many of the inhabitants, who adhered to the royal cause, were slain. The parish is situated on the road from London to Gloucester, at the base of the Cotswold hills, and comprises 3214a. 2r. 4p.: the soil is chiefly a sandy loam, with a little yellowish clay; the lands are watered by the Chelt, which flows hence into the parish of Cheltenham. A small part of the population is employed in the making of gloves. Stone of the oolite formation is quarried for rough building, and for roads. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £177, with an excellent glebe-house of recent erection; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Jesus College, Oxford; impropriator, C. W. Lovesy, Esq. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The sum of £6 is paid for instruction out of the rental of land producing £30 per annum, given by Samuel Cooper about the year 1743; the remainder is applied to the relief of the poor. Almshouses have been built; and there is a fund arising from several benefactions, of £100 a year, which is distributed among the deserving poor. A mineral spring, similar in its properties to the Cheltenham water, was lately discovered.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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