Charlcote (St. Leonard)

CHARLCOTE (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Stratford-on-Avon, Warwick division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Stratford; containing 267 inhabitants. The name is in Domesday book written Cerlecote, and is supposed to be derived from a possessor in the Saxon times. William, the son of Walter de Cerlecote, assumed the surname of Lucy about the close of the 12th century, and ever since that period the Lucy family have been the lords. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Avon, which on the south receives the waters of a stream called the Huile: it comprises 1949 acres, of which 1495 are arable, and 450 pasture; the surface is in general level, and the soil a sandy loam. The grounds of Charlcote Park, the seat of the family of Lucy, abounding with elms of stately growth, and well stocked with deer, add greatly to the beauty of the scenery. The mansion-house, a noble structure of brick and stone, was built by Sir Thomas Lucy, Knt., in the reign of Elizabeth, and forms an interesting specimen of Domestic architecture; the hall, library, and dining-room are fine apartments of large proportions, and there are some pictures of the Italian and Flemish schools. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £183; patron and impropriator, George Lucy, Esq. A few acres of glebe are in this parish, and a small portion in that of Willington. The church contains some monuments of the Lucy family, of which one, of statuary marble, to the memory of Sir Thomas and Lady Lucy, is a celebrated work of art by Bernini of Rome. At Thelesford, in the parish, a small priory for monks of the order of the Holy Trinity was founded in the reign of John, by Sir William Lucy, Knt., for the redemption of captives.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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