Chapeltown

CHAPELTOWN, a church district, in the parish of Ecclesfield, union of Wortley, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill (N. division), W. riding of York, 6 miles (N.) from Sheffield; containing about 3000 inhabitants. The district is three square miles in extent, and contains two villages. It lies on the new line of road called the Sheffield, Barnsley, Wakefield, Pontefract, and Goole road, which passes through the village of Chapeltown, as do the turnpike-road from Sheffield to Barnsley and Leeds, and the Rotherham, Worsley, and Penistone road. Coal and ironstone of good quality are obtained; and the Chapeltown Company's and Thorncliffe Company's iron-works employ respectively several hundred hands. Good stone, also, is quarried for building. The district was constituted in Sept. 1844, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37; and the erection of a church was commenced in the summer of 1847: it is in the decorated style, the cost being estimated at £2500. There are three Wesleyan places of worship. At the Thorncliffe works is an excellent chalybeate spring; and in the garden of Howsley Hall is a fine old cork-tree in full growth, supposed to be the only one in England, with the exception of that at Windsor Castle.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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