Chapel-Allerton, or Chapeltown

CHAPEL-ALLERTON, or Chapeltown, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Peter, liberty of Leeds, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Leeds, on the road to Harrogate; comprehending the villages of Chapeltown, Meanwood, Gledhow, and Moor-Allerton; and containing 2580 inhabitants. It abounds with picturesque scenery, and is noted for the salubrity of its air. The lands, which comprise by admeasurement 2763 acres, are well cultivated; and from the gentle undulation of the surface, embellished with villas and plantations, the district has a strikingly beautiful aspect. Stone of good quality abounds, and the quarries have afforded materials for the erection of the church, and several of the principal residences. The great tithes have been commuted for £260, and the small for £28. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £361; patron, the Vicar of Leeds. The church, which is in the Grecian style, was enlarged and repaired in 1840, at a cost of £1200, raised by subscription. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wesleyans; and at Meanwood is a school where divine service is performed by license from the bishop.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z