Chalgrove (St. Mary)

CHALGROVE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Bensington; containing, with Rufford liberty, 691 inhabitants. This place was distinguished in the civil war as the scene of an action that occurred at Chalgrove Field, in June, 1643, between the royalists under Prince Rupert, and a detachment of the parliamentarian army under the Earl of Essex; in which the latter were defeated, several officers killed, and the celebrated Hampden mortally wounded. In 1843, precisely two centuries afterwards, a monument was erected to the memory of Hampden, on the spot where he received his death-wound. The parish comprises 2364 acres, whereof 167 are common or waste inclosed under an act passed in 1843. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 5. 5.; net income, £276; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. Tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1797; and under the recent act, the tithes belonging to Christ-Church have been commuted for £435. 2., those belonging to the Dean and Canons of Windsor for £164. 6., and the vicarial tithes for £158. 1.: the appropriate glebe contains 65½ acres, and the vicarial 3½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church, whose steeple was struck down by lightning in 1727, contains some interesting monuments, and a curious ancient font. There are a chapel of ease at Berrick-Salome, in the parish, and a place of worship for Baptists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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