Chalcombe, or Chacombe (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CHALCOMBE, or Chacombe (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Banbury, hundred of King's Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Banbury; containing 488 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north and west by a portion of Oxfordshire, comprises 1641a. 1r. 8p.; the arable lands are rich, the dairyfarms well managed, and butter is sent in considerable quantities to the London market. The manufacture of lace and silk-stockings, and the weaving of shag, are carried on; but the trade is gradually declining. Freestone of tolerable quality is found, and the quarries have furnished materials for most of the houses in the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17.; patron, C. Wykeham Martin, Esq.: impropriators, the landowners. The great tithes have been commuted for £199. 16., and the vicarial for £240; the glebe comprises 7¼ acres, with a house, repaired in 1843. The church is a plain structure in the decorated English style, with a square tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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