Chaigeley, or Chaigley

CHAIGELEY, or CHAIGLEY, with Aighton and Bailey, a township, in the parish of Mitton, union of Clitheroe, Lower division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Clitheroe; containing 1798 inhabitants, of whom 266 are in the hamlet of Chaigeley. Of this place, anciently St. Chad's Ley, little appears in early records in an authentic form. In the reign of James I., Thomas Osbaldeston, who was accounted a felon for having slain his brother-in-law, forfeited his possessions here. Among other proprietors, were the Holdens, whose family were long owners; and the Sherburnes. Chaigeley stretches from the east-north-east brow of Longridge Fell, to the banks of the Hodder, and to Bowland, in Yorkshire; the river here separating the counties of Lancaster and York. The surface of the land is undulating, the scenery woody and picturesque, and from the higher grounds are extensive views: there are good limestone and freestone quarries. Of the chief proprietors are, the Earl of Derby, and William Winstanley, Esq., M.D., the latter of whom is lord of the manor, and holds 1200 acres in the hamlet, his son residing at the Manor House. Chaigeley Hall, a plain stone edifice, was the seat of the Holdens. The Independents have a chapel; with a school attached, endowed with £65 per annum, derived from a farm in the township, money in the funds, and houses in Ribchester. Two mineral springs here are resorted to by invalids. Within the last sixty years were standing the ruins of an ancient chapel; and some fields near the place are still called St. Chad's meadows.—See Aighton and Bailey.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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